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Press

March th, 2009

Economic News Is

Music To His Ears

-- Rhea N. Bernard (THE STAR LEDGER) The state of the economy, in the past several months, has been a major focus of news reports, government policies, everyday conversations ... and Fred Stein's lyrics. The singer/songwriter, who also plays the acoustic guitar, says he has been performing and selling his CDs in coffee shops and on college campuses for the past 10 years. A real estate appraiser by day, Stein says his purpose in writing music is to make a better world where people can communicate, do things voluntarily, help others and try to stimulate the economy through free trade and a free market. The South Brunswick resident says his musical influences include the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Who, Motown classics and, more recently, Flight of the Conchords. Stein talked to The Star-Ledger about his songwriting. What made you decide to focus on the economy in your songs?I do write some romantic songs, but when people get married or are no longer in the singles market, one of the most important things is money. The economy is a very major factor in our society, especially now because everyone's concerned about losing their job. The world is more unpredictable now. It's moving at a much faster pace. Some of my song titles include "At The Mall," "Billionaire," "She's The Shopper," "Working All The Time" and "Yield Bond Curve."What are the topics of some of your other songs? I wrote a song called "Connected," which warns people about technology. I believe technology is good, but sometimes it keeps people from interacting on a human scale. People wouldn't say bad things about a person in person, but on the computer they may not be as polite or civil. Also, with technology you never get to leave the workplace. You can never really get away and enjoy yourself during leisure time. I finished my first CD in August 2001 and my second in October 2008. On both of my CDs, I have songs about cats. That's something no other musician is writing about. I also have a song promoting the Shore town Keansburg. Another song, titled "Turn your Enemies into Friends," I believe could be the answer to war and a step toward world peace. Through my music, I'm trying to make people smile, laugh and feel more optimistic about life. All my songs are family friendly, with no curse words. The music itself is more upbeat. I don't drone on like some contemporary musicians and I preach nonviolence.

January 28th, 2009

To Laugh or Not To

Laugh? Fred Stein

Keeps Us Guessing

-- REBECCA PATTIZ (SPECTACLE) Today, while idly looking through the mail at the Spec office, I came upon a gem of an album so bizarre and yet strangely entertaining that I had to make its existence public. Titled Pizza and Ice Cream, the CD is the work of a tie-dye clad man from New Jersey named Fred Stein. On the album cover, two stock photographs, of pizza and ice cream respectively, bring the title home. “I like pizza,” I thought, “and I like ice cream, so this album must be for me.” If this was Stein’s intention—that the two most loved food items in America would draw in listeners—then he is an advertising genius. A mix of psychedelic folk, Devo- esque electronica and a touch of something else I can only describe as stoner uncle music, Pizza and Ice Cream is an eclectic work with something for everyone, whether sweet or savory. Touching on such weighty issues as the influence of technology on human relationships, in the song “Connected” and the existence of extra-terrestrials in “Outerspace manifesto,” Stein has proven that he is not your average pop star. His skills as a song writer are also evident in the song “Roaming in Wyoming ‘Cheyenne the Cat”,” an ambiguously lascivious tribute to his cat, whose catchy refrain features the repitition of the word “meow” and an endearing moniker for his cat, “Chi Chi.” “I am trying to bring fun and ideas into pop rock music,” Stein states in a letter attached to his CD. He has accomplished his goal as the album was fun—leaving the entire office in stitches—and full of ideas, however vague and substance-influenced they may be.

December 18th, 2008

Dayton Musician

Releases New Album

BY MICHAEL ACKER Staff Writer (SENTINEL) SOUTH BRUNSWICK — Fred Stein remembers tapping his pencil to songs that were stuck in his head when he was in grade school. Now, the South Brunswick resident records his own music. Stein has lived in the Dayton section of town for roughly 20 years. He was born and raised in Irvington, where he went to school, and he spent summers at his family's summer home on the Jersey shore. The 57-year-old singersongwriter has appeared on a number of cable programs and radio stations and he said that he aspires to be the third famous person to come from Irvington, after Jerry Lewis and Queen Latifah. Stein said he spent summers in Bradley Beach and then moved to South Brunswick when he got married. He described South Brunswick as a town with several diverse, middle class communities all located in a prime location. "South Brunswick is the center of New Jersey," Stein said. "Geographically, it is Exit 8A: 55 miles from New York City and 50 miles from Philly. It's the dead center of the real New Jersey." Stein recorded "Pizza and Ice Cream," his latest CD, at a Woodbridge- based recording studio called JMM Studios. Recording engineer Jerry Manno played drums, bass and occasionally lead guitar for Stein's recording. Stein said he uses an acoustic guitar. "I prefer acoustic over electric," Stein said. "It's more down to earth. It's like you get a better sound when it's acoustic. You can really hear what a person is playing as opposed to all of the tricks an electric machine is playing." Stein grew up during the 1960s and he said the music that emerged at that time serves as an important source of inspiration for the sound of his work. He said his songs have contemporary lyrics that address current issues he encounters. Stein said he chose the name "Pizza & Ice Cream" for his album in part because of a comment John Lennon made after the Beatles broke up and he heard that Paul Mc- Cartney was releasing a solo recording. He said the title of his first album, "Between Lost and Found," was inspired by a comment made by a trucker on a local radio station. The trucker was lost and he told the disc jockey that he was somewhere "between lost and found." "I can't claim credit for that expression," Stein said with a laugh. "I just try to keep my ears open and my eyes open." Stein said he begins the songwriting process with a topic in mind, and then he creates the music and writes the lyrics last. He said he reads newspapers and magazines, and tries to write about things people are talking about. Stein studied history at Monmouth University in West Long Branch and he said it helped his song writing. He now works as a real estate appraiser, after being a sub shop owner, a substitute teacher at Middlesex County College, a Goodyear Tire employee and a worker at a manufacturing company in Eatontown. Stein writes songs with humor in his latest release with songs like "Single Life," which is about being out of luck at singles bars. In "Outerspace Manifesto," Stein jokes about the possibility of an alien invasion. Stein is also a self-described cat lover, who has written songs for both of his cats. Stein's lyrics also include observations of a number of pertinent issues, which he takes a humorous approach with as well. He addresses overpopulation in the song "Too Many People," the growing reliance people have on communicating through the Web and cell phones in "Connected," as well consumerism in the song "At the Mall." Stein wrote a song set in Keansburg, a town that he said is populated by genuine people who reflect the spirit of the Jersey Shore. "It's about some girl who lived there and Keansburg is a working class town, but her boyfriend took her away from Keansburg and she wants to get back to it," Stein said. "She misses it — the rides, the people." Stein calls for peaceful resolutions and restraint from violence in the song "Hopeful Dreamer." He said he is optimistic about the future and he noted that history shows that people in general are more civil with one another than in the past. "Now there are less wars than there were before," Stein said. "I think basically people are good and a small element are bad. I think goodness will win over." Stein said he was inspired by John Lennon's "Imagine" when he wrote "Turn Your Enemies into Friends," a song about peace that calls upon all people to settle their disputes with others. Stein has many other sources of inspiration, including a diverse array of people and books such as Ayn Rand's "Atlas Shrugged." Stein counts Rodney Dangerfield as an inspiration in his life, saying that the late comedian used to work with his father in the home improvement business in Bergen County before he became a fulltime performer. Stein recalled Dangerfield as being a good worker and salesman, going door to door to see if homeowners needed work on their aluminum siding or paintwork done. "When he used to come over the house, he was very nervous and just like on TV, he'd always constantly be fixing his tie," Stein said. "He couldn't sit still. He was full of energy."
© Lorem ipsum dolor sit Nulla in mollit pariatur in, est ut dolor eu eiusmod lorem

Press

March th, 2009

Economic

News Is Music

To His Ears

-- Rhea N. Bernard (THE STAR LEDGER) The state of the economy, in the past several months, has been a major focus of news reports, government policies, everyday conversations ... and Fred Stein's lyrics. The singer/songwriter, who also plays the acoustic guitar, says he has been performing and selling his CDs in coffee shops and on college campuses for the past 10 years. A real estate appraiser by day, Stein says his purpose in writing music is to make a better world where people can communicate, do things voluntarily, help others and try to stimulate the economy through free trade and a free market. The South Brunswick resident says his musical influences include the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Who, Motown classics and, more recently, Flight of the Conchords. Stein talked to The Star-Ledger about his songwriting. What made you decide to focus on the economy in your songs?I do write some romantic songs, but when people get married or are no longer in the singles market, one of the most important things is money. The economy is a very major factor in our society, especially now because everyone's concerned about losing their job. The world is more unpredictable now. It's moving at a much faster pace. Some of my song titles include "At The Mall," "Billionaire," "She's The Shopper," "Working All The Time" and "Yield Bond Curve."What are the topics of some of your other songs? I wrote a song called "Connected," which warns people about technology. I believe technology is good, but sometimes it keeps people from interacting on a human scale. People wouldn't say bad things about a person in person, but on the computer they may not be as polite or civil. Also, with technology you never get to leave the workplace. You can never really get away and enjoy yourself during leisure time. I finished my first CD in August 2001 and my second in October 2008. On both of my CDs, I have songs about cats. That's something no other musician is writing about. I also have a song promoting the Shore town Keansburg. Another song, titled "Turn your Enemies into Friends," I believe could be the answer to war and a step toward world peace. Through my music, I'm trying to make people smile, laugh and feel more optimistic about life. All my songs are family friendly, with no curse words. The music itself is more upbeat. I don't drone on like some contemporary musicians and I preach nonviolence.

January 28th, 2009

To Laugh or

Not To Laugh?

Fred Stein

Keeps Us

Guessing

-- REBECCA PATTIZ (SPECTACLE) Today, while idly looking through the mail at the Spec office, I came upon a gem of an album so bizarre and yet strangely entertaining that I had to make its existence public. Titled Pizza and Ice Cream, the CD is the work of a tie-dye clad man from New Jersey named Fred Stein. On the album cover, two stock photographs, of pizza and ice cream respectively, bring the title home. “I like pizza,” I thought, “and I like ice cream, so this album must be for me.” If this was Stein’s intention—that the two most loved food items in America would draw in listeners—then he is an advertising genius. A mix of psychedelic folk, Devo-esque electronica and a touch of something else I can only describe as stoner uncle music, Pizza and Ice Cream is an eclectic work with something for everyone, whether sweet or savory. Touching on such weighty issues as the influence of technology on human relationships, in the song “Connected” and the existence of extra-terrestrials in “Outerspace manifesto,” Stein has proven that he is not your average pop star. His skills as a song writer are also evident in the song “Roaming in Wyoming ‘Cheyenne the Cat”,” an ambiguously lascivious tribute to his cat, whose catchy refrain features the repitition of the word “meow” and an endearing moniker for his cat, “Chi Chi.” “I am trying to bring fun and ideas into pop rock music,” Stein states in a letter attached to his CD. He has accomplished his goal as the album was fun—leaving the entire office in stitches—and full of ideas, however vague and substance- influenced they may be.

December 18th, 2008

Dayton

Musician

Releases New

Album

BY MICHAEL ACKER Staff Writer (SENTINEL) SOUTH BRUNSWICK — Fred Stein remembers tapping his pencil to songs that were stuck in his head when he was in grade school. Now, the South Brunswick resident records his own music. Stein has lived in the Dayton section of town for roughly 20 years. He was born and raised in Irvington, where he went to school, and he spent summers at his family's summer home on the Jersey shore. The 57-year-old singersongwriter has appeared on a number of cable programs and radio stations and he said that he aspires to be the third famous person to come from Irvington, after Jerry Lewis and Queen Latifah. Stein said he spent summers in Bradley Beach and then moved to South Brunswick when he got married. He described South Brunswick as a town with several diverse, middle class communities all located in a prime location. "South Brunswick is the center of New Jersey," Stein said. "Geographically, it is Exit 8A: 55 miles from New York City and 50 miles from Philly. It's the dead center of the real New Jersey." Stein recorded "Pizza and Ice Cream," his latest CD, at a Woodbridge-based recording studio called JMM Studios. Recording engineer Jerry Manno played drums, bass and occasionally lead guitar for Stein's recording. Stein said he uses an acoustic guitar. "I prefer acoustic over electric," Stein said. "It's more down to earth. It's like you get a better sound when it's acoustic. You can really hear what a person is playing as opposed to all of the tricks an electric machine is playing." Stein grew up during the 1960s and he said the music that emerged at that time serves as an important source of inspiration for the sound of his work. He said his songs have contemporary lyrics that address current issues he encounters. Stein said he chose the name "Pizza & Ice Cream" for his album in part because of a comment John Lennon made after the Beatles broke up and he heard that Paul Mc- Cartney was releasing a solo recording. He said the title of his first album, "Between Lost and Found," was inspired by a comment made by a trucker on a local radio station. The trucker was lost and he told the disc jockey that he was somewhere "between lost and found." "I can't claim credit for that expression," Stein said with a laugh. "I just try to keep my ears open and my eyes open." Stein said he begins the songwriting process with a topic in mind, and then he creates the music and writes the lyrics last. He said he reads newspapers and magazines, and tries to write about things people are talking about. Stein studied history at Monmouth University in West Long Branch and he said it helped his song writing. He now works as a real estate appraiser, after being a sub shop owner, a substitute teacher at Middlesex County College, a Goodyear Tire employee and a worker at a manufacturing company in Eatontown. Stein writes songs with humor in his latest release with songs like "Single Life," which is about being out of luck at singles bars. In "Outerspace Manifesto," Stein jokes about the possibility of an alien invasion. Stein is also a self-described cat lover, who has written songs for both of his cats. Stein's lyrics also include observations of a number of pertinent issues, which he takes a humorous approach with as well. He addresses overpopulation in the song "Too Many People," the growing reliance people have on communicating through the Web and cell phones in "Connected," as well consumerism in the song "At the Mall." Stein wrote a song set in Keansburg, a town that he said is populated by genuine people who reflect the spirit of the Jersey Shore. "It's about some girl who lived there and Keansburg is a working class town, but her boyfriend took her away from Keansburg and she wants to get back to it," Stein said. "She misses it — the rides, the people." Stein calls for peaceful resolutions and restraint from violence in the song "Hopeful Dreamer." He said he is optimistic about the future and he noted that history shows that people in general are more civil with one another than in the past. "Now there are less wars than there were before," Stein said. "I think basically people are good and a small element are bad. I think goodness will win over." Stein said he was inspired by John Lennon's "Imagine" when he wrote "Turn Your Enemies into Friends," a song about peace that calls upon all people to settle their disputes with others. Stein has many other sources of inspiration, including a diverse array of people and books such as Ayn Rand's "Atlas Shrugged." Stein counts Rodney Dangerfield as an inspiration in his life, saying that the late comedian used to work with his father in the home improvement business in Bergen County before he became a fulltime performer. Stein recalled Dangerfield as being a good worker and salesman, going door to door to see if homeowners needed work on their aluminum siding or paintwork done. "When he used to come over the house, he was very nervous and just like on TV, he'd always constantly be fixing his tie," Stein said. "He couldn't sit still. He was full of energy."